Biryani Review – Behrouz Biryani (Multiple Outlets, Hyderabad)

Today, I am reviewing a a biryani ‘PALACE’ I’ve heard about quite often in the past but never really got around to trying…. Behrouz!

Every Hyderabadi knows that if there is one thing that we cannot resist, it is Biryani. We are known for making it, for eating it and for discussing it everywhere we go. So, naturally, I have to do justice to my local heritage. Here it goes!

As usual, we have three major parameters that we are going to judge this by:

  1. Delivery / Service
  2. Packaging
  3. Food

Delivery / Service:

I am particularly pleased to say that their service was amazing. Due to personal constraints, I placed an order four days in advance and I then forgot about it. But they did not. They came on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time and delivered my food promptly. Definitely not disappointed.

I give the service 5/5.

Packaging:

This was the part which I was enthralled about. The packaging was GORGEOUS. I did not know that the biryani box could look better than the biryani itself! Okay, enough gushing. See for yourselves…

I give the packaging 5/5.

Food:

The biryani box came with a generous portion of biryani, a tiny portion of raitha and two gulab jamuns. This satiated my craving for biryani as well as my insatiable sweet tooth. There also was a tiny sachet of cardamom powder which was so delightful.

Starting with the biryani, one thing I noticed first was the delicious spread of dry fruits. The vegetables were scrumptiously fried to the right extent and the tandoori paneer was perfect – crispy on the outside and juicy on the inside. One thing I didn’t like, however, and this is my own personal opinion – is that there was far too much dry spice to it. That, I am sure, will be a definite treat for those who relish that kind of food.

Coming to the gulab jamun… what can I say? They were filling, juicy and such a wonderful touch to the end of a lovely meal.

I give the food 4/5.

Overall:

An experience I don’t regret. Good food, great taste and lives up to the Hyderabadi vibe!

Final rating: 4/5
Verdict: Go for it!

Behrouz Biryani Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Book Review: The Inimitable Chaos of Life by Maliny Mohan

I just read The Inimitable Chaos of Life by Maliny Mohan which is a collection of short stories. Here is what I thought…

BOOK COVER:

The first factor that got me hooked was the cover page of this book. Unlike most others books I have seen, this one focused on converting the title into a beautiful cover display which I found quite innovative and beautiful.

Cover Rating – 5 / 5

TITLE JUSTIFICATION:

The title is perfect for the conglomeration of tales that just flow right through the pages. Life is messy, confusing and chaotic – yet we have no other choice but to plow through and move on with our time as per destiny. The title is interesting and unique.

Title Rating – 4.5 / 5

Theme

Initially, I thought this would be a novel, but it is, in fact, multiple stories across various themes centering around life’s chaotic ways. Each story is different in its own way and what I love most about short story collections is how easy they are to read. For someone like me, who has to make time for reading, this is so simple and keeps me hooked.

Getting into the stories, while one is about life in a small town with its perks and nuances, another launches into aspirations and changed careers. From stories of kidnapping and abduction to one which authors can relate to… the mix is unending. But what struck through is the multitude of morals we can find through each of these stories. Regardless of the intent behind the writing, they are also quite deep and thought-rending.

The writing style is simple, to the point and lacks any major grammatical errors. It is easy to understand for people of all ages and shines through as an engaging read.

Rating – 4 / 5

OVERALL IMPRESSION:

All in all, this was a great read and something I would definitely recommend to everyone. However, there is one drawback and that is that this book is not available on Amazon.

Final Rating: 4 / 5

Verdict: Recommended!

 

My new novel, ‘Twisted’ is now out in stores. Take a peak into the sample chapters and order your copy today at Amazon!

Book Review: Twenty Twenty – A Race Against Time by Anuraag Srivastava

I just read Twenty Twenty – A Race Against Time by Anuraag Srivastava.
Here is what I thought.

 

BOOK COVER:

I personally did not like the book cover. It just didn’t seem like a lot of effort was put into it. It is unoriginal and bland. Sadly, this just did not work for me.

Cover Rating – 2.5 / 5

TITLE JUSTIFICATION:

The title is perfect for the plot and the story. I felt that it fit well with the essence of the novel. Time is always something that we have no control over. It slips out of our grasp before we even know it. That justifies the plot as well as the title quite well.

Title Rating – 5/5

PLOT

The genre is Thriller, which is very evident both from the cover and the title. However, there is so much more to the story than just that. The story revolves around two siblings who find themselves caught in a seemingly impossible situation where they have just twenty days to relieve themselves from their own stressful adventure.

The part I loved most about this book is that it has two female protagonists, both portrayed as powerful and sophisticated women who are able to hold their ground. It revolves around the troubles they face, the manipulations they have at the center of their hands and the relationships that are tethering at the edge of breaking points. It is very admirable to see that the author has been able to portray a side to women that isn’t really acceptable within the Indian Society. These two sisters do everything that a man does and gets away with – be it sex, power and even redemption.

It was an enjoyable read. The writing style is very good and the book is quite fast paced.

Rating – 5 / 5

OVERALL IMPRESSION:

Definite recommendation from my end. Worthy of reading and will linger with you for a long time.

Final Rating: 4 / 5
Verdict: Recommended!

Order Now!

 

The Rain Child

The house is heavy with grief.
Twisting an escaping strand of my straightened hair in my finger, I bite my lower lip to stop myself from getting emotional.
Outside, as I hear thunder, a sudden smile of secrecy escapes my pursed lips.

Abandoning my family in time of their need, I take one step back, listening to the sound of my bangles as they gently clink against one another.
I take another and then turning around, I run out of the main door.
My long, curly hair is brushing softly against my back as I break into a sprint, my lips slightly apart with the struggle of breathing. Hoisting my ankle length skirt up, I continue running till I reach the far end of my back yard.
Around me, mango trees are swaying with the wind, waving to the lightning in the sky.
I stand still, closing my eyes, my head turned towards the clouds.
My fingers have let my Tulip red skirt fall beautifully over my legs as my arms slowly start moving upwards, till they’re outstretched beside me.
A warning thunder resounds in the sky, nature’s call, and as if on cue, a drop of rain falls on my forehead. Within seconds, another plops on my nose till eventually, the drops cover my face.
I smile; loving every minute of the beauty with my eyes closed and then, I begin spinning. I don’t know how I look but if my dad were standing next to me right now, he would have said that I looked like a rose amidst the lushness of nature.

My father is my most favourite person in the entire world.
He always says that when I’m happy, he’s happy.
But I haven’t told him yet that I’m only happy when he’s around. Now, I think that it may be too late.
“Darling,” He’d say on a random day, as we both sat in our lawn, lazing around and taking in the beauty of the sunshine. “Have I ever told you the story about you and the rain?”
I’d giggle and say, “Yes! But I want to hear it again.”
He’d chuckle at my excitement and start off with the story I had heard over a hundred times in my life
“You were only nine months old!” He’d tell me, with stars in his eyes, every time he repeated that story. “A miracle baby. One day, we had left the main door ajar and you heard the rain pouring outside and crawled out.” His face would turn into dismay. “It was a good fifteen minutes before your mother and I found you. God, the horror in my heart! Would you believe, just when I was ready to call the cops, I saw you from out the window, sitting near the mango trees, giggling in the rain? I never left the door open again!”
At this memory, he fondly laughed. “My rain child.”

My father doesn’t know that he’s my rain.
I mean to tell him that if it still is possible.
Outside, where I’m standing, the rain gets heavier. I feel the cold rain drops fall on my skin and mix up with the hot tears that are scalding my cheeks.
That’s the best thing about this season.
No one needs to know how much your heart is breaking.
My father always tells me that tears are a sign of weakness.

“Don’t ever let people catch you crying.”
“But dad,” I’d whine. “Everyone cries every once in a while!”
“Not you!” He’d smile then, fondly touching the tip of my nose. “You, my dearest rain child, will just run out to where you belong. By the mango trees in the rain. Your real home. There, you’ll find happiness. If you don’t, I’ll always be here for you.”
My childish mind did not think deep enough back then to realize that ‘always’ was not a word that meant ‘forever’. That immortality will always be our biggest weakness.

I look out at the mango trees. They’ve been there for longer than I can imagine.
My father once told me that he and my mother planted them together.
I love my mother a lot. But she doesn’t compare to the bond I share with my father.
I’m careful not to tell her that because I’ll hurt her feelings but she’s aware. Anyone would be.

Falling to my knees, ignoring the pain surging up my legs, I clench both my fists to compose myself. My head is bent low and my tears are falling with a speed that matches the rain.
Death is the most terrible gift of life.
It takes away from you, precious moments that you no longer have time to share. You see your future right in front of your eyes but it’s a future you can’t have because your time is up.
My sobbing gets loud and I’m scared that someone in my family inside, weeping, will hear me.
Behind me I hear footsteps but I don’t turn.
Then, a voice.
“My dearest Rain Child,” it says, a deep male voice choked with emotion and regret.
I know it’s my father.
He wipes his tears and crouches beside me.
I look at him, one last time, my eyes brimming with tears, matching his.
Like father, like daughter.
Then, he speaks.
“You’ve decided to go to the rain!” He says, breaking down. “But why didn’t you take me with you?”
I’m sitting right next to him but he can’t see me. He can’t see me sobbing hysterically now, shouting ‘I love you’ to him over and over again. I want him to know that I’m glad that car accident took me and not him. That I’m glad that I am not the one alive right now, crying for him. That it may sound selfish but I may not be able to survive without him. That mom now has him to lean on but if he had been the one to go away, then our family would collapse.
But it’s too late for all these things.
So, I just take in the sight of him.
We have one private moment together, joined in our tears and agony.
Then, getting up, I pat his head, though he can’t see me.
For one miraculous moment, he looks up, directly into my eyes.
He may not be able to see me but he has felt my touch.
Knowing that this is the most that I can have, I run towards the pouring rain till I’m finally one with it.
Then I’m gone and so is the rain.
The sun comes up, shining brightly, as if I’ve never existed.
But far away, in my house, the wails continue.